How To Pet-Parent And Work Full Time – The Secret


So, you work full time, but you want to get a dog. You know that a pet is a major commitment, and requires significant time and resources.

If we lived in a perfect world, we would be able to work according to a flexible schedule. And our employers would allow us to be with our dogs most of the day. In the real world, working full time usually means leaving your dog at home all day.

Prepare a safe space for your dog

If you have to leave your pooch at home, make home a fun and comfortable place. Decide what part of your home you will designate as a dog-safe zone. Fill it with things to comfort your pooch and distract him during working hours.

Add a crate if you are crate-training, and use baby gates to section off the area. If your dog is a jumper, you might have to consider something higher.

Provide a comfortable bed for your best friend. If your dog is a chewer, consider a chew-proof type of bed. Also, give him some comforting items such as old items of your clothing and blankets.


Schedule a morning workout

If your dog is full of pent-up energy, he won’t be happy alone all day. But if he’s tired out, he’s more likely to be relaxed. The answer to the problem is to schedule a morning workout together.

It’ll tire him out and benefit the health of both of you. Your workout needn’t take more than 30 minutes. You could take a brisk walk or jog around the neighborhood. This is not for puppies under the age of 18 months old and senior dogs.

You could also play a game of fetch or tug while slipping in a few jumping jacks while your dog retrieves. Or how about kicking a soccer ball around a park.


Remember the toys

When you come home, set aside some time to play with your dog. Dogs need toys to play with when they’re alone. But they also like to play with you using their toys.

Give each new toy individually and make a big deal out of each one. This should help them distinguish between what is theirs and what is not to be played with. Familiar toys also bring comfort and allow them to work off excess energy to prevent frustration.